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Mexican man with end-stage kidney failure lost appeal, deported

For anyone in Greensboro with a sick family member knows just how important it is to get the appropriate medical care. When that family member is so ill that stopping medical treatment could mean death in a few weeks, families will do whatever they can to ensure that health care does not stop. Unfortunately, if the family member has a deportation order against him or her, the government may not take into account what effect deportation may have on his or her health.

Officials with Immigration and Customs Enforcement have recently denied a Mexican man's appeal of deportation orders because of end-stage kidney failure. Despite knowing that the man only has weeks to live if he cannot receive the proper treatment in Mexico, immigration officers have decided that his past mistakes outweigh the need to receive quality medical care. His legal representative has twice tried to prevent the government from deporting the man, but he was ultimately unsuccessful in staying the deportation.

The 50-year-old man has been living in the United States since he was 24-years-old, but is now being sent back to a country where he has no family and no one to care for him. In addition to the extremely serious kidney disease, he also has congestive heart failure, diabetes and high blood pressure.

Sadly, the ultimate decision about whether he stayed or left fell on an ICE agent. No courts or judges had a say in enforcing the deportation order and it was a field office director who denied the man's petition to stay in the country in which he had spent most of his adult life. In the end, it was the man's two felony drug convictions and that he had been deported three times before that tipped the scale toward deportation.

Source: Sacramento Bee, "Serious illness complicates deportation case," Grace Rubenstein, Jan. 14, 2012

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